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Rare One-Inch Maps

1. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Scotland, sheet 104, with hills (CCSA 218A/1)
2. One-inch (1:63,360) second edition map of Scotland, sheet 83, with hills (CCSA 218A/2)
3. One-inch (1:63,360) second edition map of Scotland, sheet 84, with hills (CCSA 218A/3/1)
4. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Scotland, sheet 99, with hills (CCSA 218A/3/2)
5. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Scotland, sheet 105, with hills (CCSA 218A/3/3)
6. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Scotland, sheet 109, with hills (CCSA 218A/3/4)
7. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Scotland, sheet 118, with hills (CCSA 218A/3/5)

The five third edition maps were all probable casualties of the abandoning in 1911-12 of the publication of hachured versions of the one-inch engraved map. They were probably sheets almost ready for publication at the time, and while given a limited circulation to some university libraries, were never sent to the legal deposit collections, and probably were not sold to the public. The second edition sheets were probably similarly cancelled with publication imminent in third edition. The hills edition of sheet 83 progressed no further; in the event sheet 84 would suffer the same fate of cancellation a second time as a third edition sheet.

From copies transferred in 2017 to the National Library of Scotland

8. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Ireland, sheet 36, lithographed reprint (CCSA 218A/4/1)
See also sheets 33, 45, 101 (Nos 51, 52, 53). Though listed in the publication report in March 1915, this map was not sent to legal deposit collections, and has still not been located in engraved form. Two lithographic reprints have been recorded, one of which is now lost.

From a copy in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

9. One-inch (1:63,360) second edition map of Ireland, sheet 129, with hills, without contours (CCSA 218A/4/2)
Publication of the second edition map of Ireland with hills was delayed until after the addition of contours to the outline plate. A few second edition hills sheets have been recorded without contours, perhaps made for some internal purpose of the Ordnance Survey. Probably none of them were sold to the public.

From a copy in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

10. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Ireland, sheet 129, republished 1890, with hills (CCSA 218A/4/3)
Thirty sheets of the first edition map of Ireland, covering the eastern central area, were republished between 1888 and 1895 based on revision for the second edition of the six-inch map. All were published in outline editions. This one sheet was prepared also in a hills version, but was probably not on public sale.

From a copy in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

11. One-inch (1:63,360) Revised New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 4, with hills (CCSA 218A/4/4)
12. One-inch (1:63,360) Revised New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 5, with hills (CCSA 218A/4/5)

13. One-inch (1:63,360) Revised New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 1, with hills (CCSA 218A/4/6)
The preparation of separate hills plates had yet to be completed for just a handful of sheets in northern England in 1903-4 as the Third Edition of the one-inch map superseded the Revised New Series. Thus sheets 1, 4, 5 were first published in hills editions in the Third Edition of the New Series: these copies printed later on the Revised New Series map are at present the only ones recorded.

From copies in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

14. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 99, outline edition, incomplete (CCSA 218A/5/1)
This sheet was first issued as one of seven sheets in the separate Isle of Lewis series in 1858. The Harris portion of the sheet was added early in the 1880s, in this version without waterlining, vegetation and very few contours. The imprint was altered again when the sheet was published in 1884.

From a copy in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

15. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) War Revision sheet 74 (CCSA 218A/5/2)
‘ARP’ revision was added to the military one-inch map of England and Wales, and Scotland, which were then published as War Revision, probably beginning June 1940. By December 1940 the more refined Second War Revision was already being printed. Nine sheets were apparently never issued in War Revision form, but directly in Second War Revision. A handful of others were briefly available in War Revision before being cancelled: War Revision sheet 74 is thus recorded in this unique copy.

From a copy in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

16. One-inch (1:63,360) Old Series map of England and Wales, sheet 37 (CCSA 218A/6)
This is one of three Old Series sheets (the others are 13 and 36) which are known to have been engraved around 1820-1, but which were rejected and wholly re-engraved before eventual publication in 1830-33. As compared with the published version of sheet 37, the text is rather more bold, and the hachuring is less refined. The published version also incorporates various topographic and placename revisions, and is probably planimetrically more reliable. A photocopy of sheet 13 is also known (CCS Archives, L140/2), unfortunately discovered too late for inclusion in Hellyer and Oliver’s 'The first Ordnance Survey map'. Its original has so far not been discovered.

From a copy in a private collection

17. GSGS 4136 Ireland one-inch (1:63,360) sheet 336, first edition (CCSA 218A/7)
18. GSGS 4136 Ireland one-inch (1:63,360) sheet 314, first edition (CCSA 218A/8/1)

The intention to publish the military one-inch map of Ireland in the standard 205 sheets was cancelled in June 1940 and the large sheet GSGS 4136 in 76 sheets was published instead. The first edition was superseded by the second within weeks, and before the end of 1940 the third edition was already in progress. Thus sheets of the second edition are uncommon, and those of the first edition almost non-existent: six single copies have been recorded so far. These are two of those six.

From copies in a private collection

19. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 271, zincographed (CCSA 218A/8/2)
20. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 272, zincographed (CCSA 218A/9/1)

See also sheet 273 (No.40). When the New Series was authorised in 1872 it was expected that it would follow the now established pattern of being published first in an outline edition, and later in an alternative version with hills, both being produced by engraving. However, it was anticipated that some sheets might be needed for military purposes sooner than the hills could be engraved, and so a provisional zincographed version was also authorised. In the event very few of these seem to have been produced. The hills of these two sheets are in brown and were printed from transfers to zinc. No copies of the first printings are known to survive, these reprints being issued in 1892-3.

From copies in a private collection

21. One-inch (1:63,360) map of England and Wales, sheet 161, temporary advance edition with hills (CCSA 218A/9/2)

Hill engraving took so long to accomplish that the Ordnance Survey determined upon the temporary measure of issuing an advance edition of England and Wales sheets with hills printed from transfers to zinc. The programme began with this sheet 161 in 1892. That it seems not to have reached legal deposit collections, nor gone on sale to the public may have been caused by its erroneous appearance in the publication report as sheet 162; thus two copies in private collections are the only ones so far recorded. The advance edition of sheet 161 was published in a second form late in 1894.

From a copy in a private collection

24. One-inch (1:63,360) map of England and Wales, sheet 144 Plymouth, 1914 (CCSA 218A/12)
In 1914 the Ordnance Survey published for official use copies of the 'Aldershot North' and 'Aldershot South' district sheets coloured with the delicate array of hachuring, hills shading and contouring in the style made famous for its appearance in 1913 on 'Killarney District'. Copies of these sheets are relatively well known. This 'Plymouth' sheet, also for official use, is on the sheet lines of sheet 144 of the forthcoming Popular Edition, and in the same colouring as the Aldershot sheets, but is previously not recorded.

From a copy in a private collection

26. One-inch (1:63,360) Old Series map of England and Wales, sheet 107NE (CCSA 218A/14/1)
The one-inch Old Series map in northern England was much in demand, in many cases before it was available. There are many examples in existence of sheets printed before some features, usually contours, waterlining, wood and rough pasture infill, had been engraved. A few of these have the handwritten “Unfinished copy”, usually on hills copies which lack also the hachures. This is an example. The parish name ARTH[URET] is also handwritten.

From a copy in a private collection

27. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 104, with layers (CCSA 218A/14/2)
28. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 105, with layers (CCSA 218A/15)
29. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 112, with layers (CCSA 218A/16)
30. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 113, with layers (CCSA 218A/17)
31. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 122, with layers (CCSA 218A/18)
32. GSGS 3907 England and Wales one-inch (1:63,360) Second War Revision 123, with layers (CCSA 218A/19)

In 1947 the Staff College requested copies of one-inch sheets with the addition of layers, for the training of officers. These six Second War Revision sheets were supplied.

From copies in a private collection

34. One-inch (1:63,360) Aldershot Area (North) (CCSA 218A/22)
35. One-inch (1:63,360) Aldershot Area (North) [with list of hunts] (CCSA 218A/21/2)
36. One-inch (1:63,360) Aldershot Area (South) (CCSA 218A/23/2)
37. One-inch (1:63,360) Aldershot Area (South) [with list of hunts] (CCSA 218A/23/1)

In 1923 the first single map covering the Aldershot Command at the one-inch scale was published, but evidently there remained a requirement for a north/south pair of district maps, forming part of a sequence of such maps published in 1905, 1914, 1919 and 1932. The publication date of this version is not given and these reprints dated from 1926, marked up by hand with the meeting points of hunts in the area. There are second copies in which the list of hunts attached to each sheet is revealed.

From copies in a private collection

38. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 255, coloured (CCSA 218A/24/1)
39. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 274, coloured (CCSA 218A/24/2)

Possibly the earliest attempt of the Ordnance Survey to publish a one-inch map in colour, these two New Series sheets were issued in 1887 with outline in black, water in blue and contours in red. They were probably purely experimental, there being no indication either in publication reports or catalogues that they were intended for public sale. Two copies of each sheet only are recorded.

From copies in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.3 and at Maps.aa.G.014.2

40. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 273, with grey horizontal hachures (CCSA 218A/24/3)

See also sheets 271 and 272 (Nos 19, 20). When the New Series was authorised in 1872 it was expected that it would follow the now established pattern of being published first in an outline edition, and later in an alternative version with hills, both being produced by engraving. However, it was anticipated that some sheets might be needed for military purposes sooner than the hills could be engraved, and so a provisional zincographed version was also authorised. In the event very few of these seem to have been produced. The hills of this sheet are in the form of grey ‘horizontal hachures’, or form-lines, and were printed from transfers to zinc. It was printed in 1886.

From a copy now in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.4

41. One-inch (1:63,360) Isle of Wight (CCSA 218A/25/1)

In September 1852 a ‘revision’ of the Isle of Wight was authorised, which seems to have taken the form of a complete resurvey, mostly at the two-inch (1:31,680) scale, but with the Queen’s estate at Osborne remapped at the 24-inch (1:2640) scale. The resurvey was engraved in outline form in the second half of the 1850s, but then work was suspended and was never resumed: this may have been because of a further resurvey of the island at 1:2500 which began in 1859 for defence planning purposes, followed by the development of the ‘New Series’ one-inch on different sheet lines. Three copies of this map are known, an original of circa 1859 in The National Archives (Public Record Office), and two copies printed in 1909, of which this is one. These later copies have been subjected to security treatment: four forts have been deleted.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.1

42. One-inch (1:63,360) Glasgow and its environs (CCSA 218A/25/2)

This sheet, printed by lithography, appeared in the Ordnance Survey's list of publications issued in August 1885. For some reason the map did not reach the legal deposit collections, and so far only two copies are known, one of the original printing in the University Library, Glasgow, and this one, remarkably of an 1889 reprint.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library

49. One-inch (1:63,360) New Series map of England and Wales, sheet 284, with hills (CCSA 218A/32/1)
This is an unused engraving made in about 1883, some five years earlier than the published version. Apparently signed by H Baker, the engraver of the outline and ornament elements.

From a copy in a private collection

50. Withdrawn, replaced by No.205

51. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Ireland, sheet 33, lithographed reprint (CCSA 218A/34/1)
52. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Ireland, sheet 45, lithographed reprint (CCSA 218A/34/2)
53. One-inch (1:63,360) Third Edition map of Ireland, sheet 101, engraved (CCSA 218A/34/3)

See also sheet 36 (No.8). Sheets 33 and 45 were listed in the May 1915 publication report; sheet 101 was printed in 1917, but none of these sheets were sent to legal deposit collections. Sheet 33 (and 36) have still not been located in engraved form, and just a single engraved copy of each of the other two is known (the engraved copy of sheet 45 has recently been discovered in the Map Library, Trinity College, Dublin).

From copies in the University Library, Glasgow

54. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 20, outline (CCSA 218A/35)

This sheet was first published with coverage of Kintyre and Gigha, but not Islay. This copy was printed in August 1876 with an imprint naming Sir Henry James as Superintendent; two months later the generally available printing was published which named Major General Cameron as Director General.

From a copy in the University Library, Glasgow

58. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 13, with hills, incomplete (CCSA 218A/39/1)
This sheet was first published with the Ayrshire area mapped, but not the Isle of Arran. This copy was printed in June 1870, by which date the island had been added, though the hachures had yet to be engraved

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

59. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 21, outline, incomplete (CCSA 218A/39/2)

As first published the Ayrshire area was mapped, but not Argyll and very little of Bute. This is a copy printed in July 1868 on which the Islands of Arran, Bute and Inchmarnock have been added, but still not Kintyre.

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

60. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 29, outline, incomplete (CCSA 218A/40/1)

As first published the Dunbartonshire, Renfrewshire and Ayrshire areas of this sheet were mapped, but as yet not Argyll or the Island of Bute. This is a copy printed in September 1868.

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

61. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 67, outline, incomplete (CCSA 218A/40/2)

An incomplete printing, lacking contours, vegetation, parish names and waterlining, this copy was issued in about 1869, some two years before the date of publication of the map complete.

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

62. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland, sheet 32, with zones of altitudes (CCSA 218A/41/1)

An alternative to showing hill forms by hachuring is demonstrated in this sheet, where the contours have been ‘illuminated’, or ‘shaded’, as it is sometimes termed, to give the effect of relief built up by steps, rather like a relief model built up by blocks. Scotland sheet 32 was published in this style in June 1858. This is one of three recorded copies showing the sheet still in preparation, with the levels hand-coloured in increasing intensities of brown. Similar experimental work had been undertaken earlier in Ireland, and ten years later one-inch sheets covering the English Lake Districts were prepared to accompany the report of a Royal Commission on Water Supply. A block ten sheets were made to supply the district maps required; of those ten, nine were later sold to the public.

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

63. One-inch (1:63,360) first edition map of Scotland sheet 98, outline (CCSA 218A/41/2)

As first published in 1858 the Lewis area of this sheet was mapped, but not the Harris. This copy printed in July 1883 is the earliest recorded to show Harris in addition. This version was apparently deemed unsatisfactory, and when finally published in September 1884, the sheet had different lettering and a different imprint from those shown here.

From a copy in the collection of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

68. One-inch (1:63,360) Forres special sheet (CCSA 218B/43/2)
At the time of the publication of the Charles Close Society book 'Military Maps' in 2004, no one-inch third edition map either of England and Wales or Scotland had been located with a military grid. Now this special map of Forres has been recorded, presumably made for a military exercise in 1926, some time before the Popular Edition sheets of this area had been published. This copy is a 1928 reprint; the principal point of distinction between this and the civilian parent is that the hachures have been omitted. Overprinted in purple is the standard War Office Cassini British system grid, its origin at Dunnose, which was in use until 1931.

From a copy in a private collection

69. One-inch (1:63,360) map of Ireland sheet 49 (CCSA 218B/44/2)

The '1” provisional edition for military purposes only' of Ireland was apparently initiated in 1915. Special features incorporated as required by the War Office were the division of the border into two-inch alpha-numeric blocks, no doubt for referencing purposes, magnetic variation data, and contours overprinted in red. The number of sheets recorded even now is still in single figures, and there is no record of whether the map had national coverage, or merely of areas of interest to the military. In the preparation of the one-inch map of Northern Ireland, GSGS 3917, in 1932, the Ordnance Survey in Southampton reused the red contour plates made for this edition, insofar as they existed.

From a copy in the Charles Close Society Archive, CCS L24/38

78. One-inch (1:63,360) New Forest, 1945 proof, with National Grid (CCSA 218B/45)
The one-inch 'New Forest' tourist map was published in 1938, based on Fifth Edition drawings. Although carrying the yard grid which was current at the time, the map was actually laid out on sheet lines conforming with the new metric grid which had been one of the recommendations of the Davidson Committee. But for the war, the National Grid, as it came to be known, might have come into use in 1939; in the event its first appearance at the one-inch scale was delayed until 1945. 'New Forest' was one of several pre-war tourist and district maps that the Ordnance Survey had plans to issue in the years following the war, but as with most of them was to suffer loss of priority and in the event to be cancelled. But not before the map reached proof stage, and a single copy of the map in proof form, carrying the National Grid for which it had been designed, is known to survive.

From a copy in the Charles Close Society Archive, CCS L101/4

87. One-inch sheet 120, on Popular Edition sheet lines, 1916 (CCSA 218B/47/9)
[Sorry, we do not have permission to display this map on-line]
“He (i.e. Charles Close as Director General) did a number of experiments, amongst which the Killarney sheet is the best known. To my mind, however, the most useful thing he produced as an experiment was a map of Somersetshire (Bridgwater) which now hangs in the office of O.Maps. A quite beautiful bit of work. These experiments went on for some time, and I remember them vividly….and was privileged to talk a good deal to Close about his ideas.” So wrote H StJ L Winterbotham as he retired as Director General in 1934, in 'Sidelights', the confidential handover notes he wrote for his successor M N MacLeod.
It is probable, though unproven, that these notes refer to this copy of sheet 120. For further information on the historical background and the enhanced colour techniques used, readers are directed to Richard Oliver’s comments in Sheetlines 32 (1992), 6, and to Yolande Hodson, Popular Maps, London: Charles Close Society, 1999, 26-7. There is a copy of 'Sidelights' in Cambridge University Library at CCS 403/5.

From a copy in a private collection

89. One-inch Old Series map of England and Wales, Isle of Man – unfinished impression (CCSA 218B/48)
This, the final Old Series sheet, was published in outline form in December 1873 and with hills in February 1874. Significantly, between the two, in January 1874 falls the publication date of the first New Series sheet, 285, and with it the start of the demise of the Old Series. Thus the Isle of Man sheet, nominally Old Series sheet 100, would never carry this sheet number – indeed no number at all until 1881-2 when New Series numbers were finally added to the Old Series sheets still in use north of the Preston to Hull line. This is the earliest known printing of the map, annotated Unfinished in a contemporary hand. Incomplete elements include the border, the only lines drawn being those parallel to the neatline, with ticks added for the latitude and longitude values. Also missing are the rough ground and wood ornament, spot heights, trig heights and even some trig points. Sand ornament is complete only round the NE quarter. The name Isle of Man has yet to be engraved, also a handful of other names, the New Series cutting lines, and the sheet diagrams in the lower margin.

From a copy in a private collection

90. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 107, with military grid (CCSA 218B/49/1)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. This sheet is overprinted in a deep red with a 10,000-yard and quartered 2000-yard grid. The principal squares are lettered A to O, the 2000 yard subdivisions 1 to 25, quartered a to d using pecked lines. The origin is in the north-west corner, with grid lines parallel to the sheet lines of the map.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.9

91. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 115, with military grid (CCSA 218B/49/2)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. This sheet is overprinted in red with a six-mile and quartered one-mile grid. The principal squares are lettered A to O, the one-mile subdivisions 1 to 36, quartered a to d. The origin is in the north-west corner, with grid lines parallel to the sheet lines of the map. The grid line at the outer edge of the six-mile squares around the edge of the sheet is present (see No.93).

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library

92. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 115, with military grid (CCSA 218B/49/3)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. This sheet is overprinted in red with a 12,000-yard and quartered 2000-yard grid. The principal squares are lettered A to L, the 2000 yard subdivisions 1 to 36, quartered a to d. The origin is in the north-west corner, with grid lines parallel to the sheet lines of the map. Sheet 124 (No.174) is also recorded overprinted with this grid.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.8

93. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 115, with military grid (CCSA 218B/49/4)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. This sheet is overprinted in red with a six-mile and quartered one-mile grid. The principal squares are lettered A to O, the one-mile subdivisions 1 to 36, quartered a to d. The origin is in the north-west corner, with grid lines parallel to the sheet lines of the map. This version differs from No.91 in that the grid line at the outer edge of the six-mile squares around the edge of the sheet are missing (see No.91).

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library

94. One-inch Aldershot District (South), 1914, with military grid (CCSA 218B/49/5)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. The present sheet shares with Aldershot District (North) a system of twelve-inch squares overprinted in red, lettered from A to F, each subdivided into 36 quartered two-inch squares (see No.176).

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library

97. One-inch New Popular Edition sheet 167, with an experimental graticule reference system, 1945 (CCSA 218B/49/8)
Experimental versions of one-inch New Popular Edition sheet 167 Salisbury and 1:25,000 Larkhill and Westdown were printed for artillery training with a graticule referencing system in place of a grid. This is based on sectors of 5º of latitude and 5º of longitude, each given a single letter reference (in this case F), the 25 1º subdivisions being identified by a second letter. Thus the 51º N, 2º W zone containing Salisbury has the letter reference FT. There were three trial variants of the one-inch sheet, printed by the Ordnance Survey in November 1945:
1. With a mesh in 100th of degrees overprinted in purple (the image reproduced here).
2. With a mesh in 100th of degrees and partial ladder, overprinted in purple.
3. With a minute mesh and partial ladder, overprinted in purple.
The published version was entitled D.R.A.’s investigation of graticules. It has a minute mesh in black, and a print code 500/11/45 Cr.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.10

100. One-inch Third Edition Scotland, sheet 49, overprinted with War Office British system grid (CCSA 218B/49/11)
As Richard Oliver pointed out in Military maps (London: Charles Close Society, 2004, 11) “enough copies [of the military version of the one-inch Popular Edition] have been located to suggest that the first priority, in 1923-4, was for areas of particular military interest”. Thus England and Wales Popular Edition sheets 99, 107, 113 to 117, 122, 123, 132, 133 and 144 were among the first published, in addition to a special map of the Aldershot Command. When it comes to Scotland, it was still more than a year before publication of the Popular Edition would even be begun, so it would be logical to assume the publication of some substitute Third Edition sheets, covering military training areas. One such has now been recorded – sheet 49, published in 1924, four years earlier than the Popular Edition maps of the area. It covers the training area at Barry Buddon, which had been sold to the War Office by Lord Panmure in 1897. Named are the artillery range, rifle ranges, Buddon Batteries, another Buddon Battery, and between them the S.N.A.A. Camp. There are further defensive positions of a Battery at Broughty Ferry and a Gun Platform at Tayport. None of these were classified as secret installations, and all of them also appeared on printings intended for public use.

From a copy in a private collection

138. One-inch The Curragh District, 1926 (CCSA 218B/51/1)
Very few small-scale maps reprinted by the newly independent Ordnance Survey of Ireland in the years before the Second World War have been recorded, the reason, no doubt, being that the stocks of maps printed before 1922 in most cases proved an adequate supply for many years. The publication of this new map of The Curragh District in 1926 is thus of particular significance. It covers a larger area than its 1903 predecessor, which is known in reprints to 1911, and it has the same revision date of 1898. There is unlikely to be much if any further revision of detail, since the second national revision did not cover the area of the Curragh.

The present map is a 1935 reprint of the map first published in 1926, but there are indications that it was initiated before 1922. The map border is in the style of the third edition large sheet maps of Cork, Dublin and Belfast published in 1918, the lettering of the title is entirely consistent, and there may be significance in the copyright statement “Crown Copyright Reserved”. But the legend seems unconnected with the pre-1922 map, as do the instructions in the use of the grid. Oddly, the map has no Ordnance Survey of Ireland heading, usually top left.

The map measures 24 by 26 inches, and carries a two-inch alpha numeric squaring system. Hill depiction is by hypsometric tints, with a twelve-section layer bar, and may well be the first layered (without hill shading) one-inch Ordnance Survey map of Ireland.

From a copy in a private collection

174. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 124, with military grid (CCSA 218B/52/1)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. This sheet is overprinted in red with a 12,000-yard and quartered 2000-yard grid. The principal squares are lettered A to L, the 2000 yard subdivisions 1 to 36, quartered a to d. The origin is in the north-west corner, with grid lines parallel to the sheet lines of the map. Sheet 115 (No.92) is also recorded overprinted with this grid.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library

175. One-inch Third Edition (Large Sheet Series) sheet 135, with military grid (CCSA 218B/52/2)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War. This sheet is overprinted in red with a 2000-yard alpha-numeric squaring system, with 400-yard subdivisions numbered 1 to 25. Part of the overprint cancels the two-inch blocks in the border of the map. The system is parallel to the sheet lines of the map, with the square 9A in the north-west corner. The function of this grid has yet to be explained.

From a copy in the Map Department, Cambridge University Library, at Maps.aa.G.014.7

176. One-inch Aldershot District (North), 1914, with military grid (CCSA 218B/52/3)
This is one of a few one-inch sheets overprinted during the First World War with military grids in the style of those in use on the western front, presumably for artillery training purposes. The present sheet shares with Aldershot District (South) a system of twelve-inch squares overprinted in red, lettered from A to F, each subdivided into 36 quartered two-inch squares (see No.94).

From a copy in a private collection

200. I.D. 1083 Air Packet 46 explanatory sheet, July 1916 (CCSA 218B/52/28)
201. I.D. 1083 Air Packet 46 sheet 34, July 1916 (CCSA 218B/52/29)
For information see the note attached to Nos 101 to 137

From copies in a private collection

204. One-inch (1:63,360) Ballymena & Coleraine (Large Sheet) (CCSA 218B/55/1)
Correspondence in 1871 between Ordnance Survey officers reveals that while it might be considered desirable to publish the one-inch map of Ireland in full sheet format, it was impractical either to cancel the quarter sheets or to publish sheets in two different sizes. However, publication of this Ballymena & Coleraine large sheet, being ready, was permitted.

Together with the similar large sheets of Belfast and Drogheda, this copy was donated to Trinity College Library Dublin in 2012, and we are grateful to the College for permission to reproduce it here. Trinity College also holds both versions of the rather better known Dublin sheet. No copy of Inishowen, the only other large sheet known to have been made, has so far been recorded: the copper plate is held in the National Archives of Ireland (OS 106/21).

From a copy in Trinity College Library, Dublin

205. One-inch (1:63,360) Belfast (Large Sheet) (CCSA 218B/55/2)
Correspondence in 1871 between Ordnance Survey officers reveals that while it might be considered desirable to publish the one-inch map of Ireland in full sheet format, it was impractical either to cancel the quarter sheets or to publish sheets in two different sizes. However, publication of this Belfast large sheet, being ready, was permitted. The presence of the copyright note indicates that this copy could not have been printed before January 1888. The price note was also a later addition.

Together with the similar large sheets of Ballymena & Coleraine, and Drogheda, this copy was donated to Trinity College Library Dublin in 2012, and we are grateful to the College for permission to reproduce it here. Trinity College also holds both versions of the rather better known Dublin sheet. No copy of Inishowen, the only other large sheet known to have been made, has so far been recorded: the copper plate is held in the National Archives of Ireland (OS 106/21).

From a copy in Trinity College Library, Dublin

206. One-inch (1:63,360) Drogheda (Large Sheet) (CCSA 218B/55/3)
Correspondence in 1871 between Ordnance Survey officers reveals that while it might be considered desirable to publish the one-inch map of Ireland in full sheet format, it was impractical either to cancel the quarter sheets or to publish sheets in two different sizes. However, publication of this Drogheda large sheet, being ready, was permitted. The chief engraver examined and approved the printing of this copy on 26 April 1880.

Together with the similar large sheets of Ballymena & Coleraine and Belfast, this copy was donated to Trinity College Library Dublin in 2012, and we are grateful to the College for permission to reproduce it here. Trinity College also holds both versions of the rather better known Dublin sheet. No copy of Inishowen, the only other large sheet known to have been made, has so far been recorded: the copper plate is held in the National Archives of Ireland (OS 106/21).

From a copy in Trinity College Library, Dublin